Accident Measures Agreement

During the first meetings, the parallels with the main SALT negotiations showed a certain degree of mutual concern about the problem of fortuitous war, which showed encouraging prospects for reaching an agreement. This preparatory work resulted in the establishment of two ad hoc working groups, under the guidance of the two SALT delegations. One group focused on how to exchange information in order to reduce uncertainties and avoid misunderstandings in the event of a nuclear incident. The other looked at a related topic — ways to improve direct communication between Washington and Moscow. By the summer of 1971, important substantive issues had been resolved and salterrorière delegations had transmitted draft international agreements to their Governments. Both agreements were signed in Washington on September 30, 1971 and entered into force that day. Another objective of this agreement is to maintain open relations between the United States, the Soviet Union and their allies. Statute Signed in Washington on 30 September 1971, the Accident Agreement entered into force on that day. The duration of the agreement is not limited and the parties undertake to consult on possible issues and to examine possible amendments aimed at further reducing the risks.

The agreement provides that for urgent communication ”in situations requiring immediate clarification”, the ”Hot Line” is used. The duration of the agreement is not limited and the parties undertake to consult on possible issues and to examine possible amendments aimed at further reducing the risks. The agreement will enter into force immediately after signature by both parties. The most well-known arms control contracts (such as the New START Treaty that came into force in 2011) are those that limit nuclear weapons and delivery systems. However, many lesser-known contracts and agreements may be more relevant to this debate. Here we present examples of agreements aimed at preventing misunderstandings that could lead to wars and treaties that limit or prohibit nuclear testing. The mere existence of nuclear weapons systems, even among the most sophisticated command and control procedures, seems to give rise to serious concern. Despite sophisticated precautions, it is possible that technical malfunctions or human error, a misinterpreted incident or unauthorized action could cause a nuclear disaster or nuclear war.

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